Pevex Stoves

Pevex Stoves, one of our many suppliers have just launched their brand new website!

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It features a comprehensive overview of all of their brands which includes: 

  • Bohemia X
  • Newbourne
  • Eco range
  • Pevex
  • Heta
  • Keddy
  • Invicta

AM Chimneys can provide you with all of these stove brands too!

About Pevex Stoves…

Pevex Enterprises Ltd was established in 1993 as importers and ditstributors of traditional firebaskets, grates and firebacks to the fireplace industry. 

Now they are a major distributor of traditional and contemporary stoves in the UK and are evolving and continuing to seek out further new products, as well as developing existing ranges for the benefit of all of their customers.

So if you’re interested in anything Pevex has to offer, contact us for a quote and we can provide you with your dream stove at the best price!

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How to light a fire!

In this post we’re going to share a few basic tips on how to light a fire! To read more on this subject, click here!

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Log fires

Igniting:

  • Fully open the Primary and Airwash controls.
  • Place a firelighter or paper together with dry kindling wood on the grate and light the firelighter or paper.
  • Leave the door slightly open as the fire establishes and the glass warms, avoiding the possible build up of condensation.
  • Add larger pieces of wood to build the fire but not too many! Too many logs may smother the fire.
  • Close the door fully when the fire is established.
  • Close the Primary air control. Use the Airwash to control the burn rate when the appliance is at operating temperature.

Refueling:

  • Open the Primary and Airwash controls fully.
  • Rake the embers over the grate to establish a glowing fire bed (if the fire bed is low add a small amount of kindling wood to help re-establish the fire.
  • Place new logs in an open arrangement to allow oxygen to easily reach every part of the fire. Compact loading will make the wood burn slower; cause the fire to smolder and produce more smoke.
  • Burn the new logs at high output for 3-5 minutes before closing the primary air control. Adjust the burn rate using the Airwash control. Do not close the air controls until the fire is burning well.
  • Refuel little and often for clean, efficient burning.

Useful tips!*

  • Make sure your logs are well-seasoned and dry. We have a post all about what wood to burn in your fire so if you’re not sure click here!
  • Burning the stove at high output for a short period also reduces tars and creosote.
  • Don’t load logs above any log guard that is fitted, or any secondary air outlets in the back of the firebox.
  • A bright and clean firebox shows that the stove is burning well.

*These tips are for general guidance only and the manufacturer’s instructions and fuel recommendations should always be followed!

Solid fuel fires

Igniting:

  • Fully open the Primary air control and half open the Airwash control.
  • Place a firelighter or paper together with dry kindling wood on the grate and light the firelighter or paper.
  • Leave the door slightly open as the fire establishes and the glass warms, avoiding the possible build up of condensation.
  • Add slightly larger pieces of wood to build the fire.
  • Add your fuel. This must be anthracite, smokeless fuels, turf/peat briquettes etc. suitable for closed appliances.
  • Do not smother the fire.
  • Close the door fully when the fire is established.

Refueling:

  • De-ash the fire bed.
  • Fully open the Primary air control to fully establish a glowing bed before adding more fuel.
  • Allow the fuel to burn at high output for a few minutes before adjusting the Primary air control to your desired setting.
  • Refuel little and often for clean, efficient burning.

 

A visit to Interfocos!

In this post we’re going to talk about our recent trip to Holland with Interfocos!

Check them out for your gas or solid fuel fire at www.interfocos.com

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 We were recently invited by Interfocos to pop over to Badel in Holland. This was to have a look at their new products, to get feedback from an installers point of view and a suppliers point of view on their current range!

It was great to finally meet Tonny and Dirk whom I have spoken to many times when they’ve asked me to resolve issues they have had on various jobs in England. They have now all been successfully resolved and all been down to installation errors.

This is why it’s important to have a qualified installer to fit one of the many Interfocos fires.

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After a brief introduction of the history of Interfocos and new products, we went on a tour of the factory. An amazing place and so spotless you could eat your dinner off the floor!

 They have some great new models coming out and the floating view bell, wall mounted looks particularly impressive.

The new non reflective glass models are even more amazing giving you the real feel of an open fire but gas fired!

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I spoke to Dirk about an installation view I had to make things easier and within 10 minutes got the technical clearance to proceed with my idea! This could also save Interfocos thousands.

A great couple of days and all finished off with my own personally named Cloggs as a gift from all at Interfocos.

Thanks again guys!

Why is it important to have my Chimney Swept?

In this post, we’re going to talk about why it’s important to have your Chimney swept to ensure that it’s looked after and will last a long time!

Chimney-Sweep-PersonWhy do I need to have my Chimney/Flue swept?

Chimneys need to allow free passage of dangerous combustion gasses. Regular cleaning will remove soot and creosote, helping to prevent dangerous chimney fires. Cleaning will increase the efficiency of some appliances. Bird nests, cobwebs and other blockages will be removed.

How often does my chimney need sweeping?

The sweeping frequencies below are for guidance. Frequency will depend on a number of factors including: Type of fuel, appliance used, duration of use, moisture content of wood fuel, type of chimney. Your Guild sweep will be able to advise on sweeping frequency during the appointment, the sweeping frequencies below are for guidance.

Smokeless fuel: At least once a year
Wood: Quarterly when in use
Bituminous coal: Quarterly when in use
Oil: Once a year
Gas: Once a year

Why should I use a Chimney Sweep recommended by AM Chimneys?

At AM Chimneys we love to give our customers assurance that if cared for properly, your fireplace will last a very long time! By using a Chimney sweep from our recommended list, you can be sure to have someone fully qualified and able to care for your chimney!

Does it make a mess?

This is a very good question to ask when booking any Chimney sweep. The answer should be – very rarely. Chimney sweeps have a number of the best practice techniques for preventing dust escapes. A rare exception may be when the chimney is blocked with a bird’s nest when it is sometimes difficult to contain all dust.

What should I do to prepare for the sweep’s visit?

Ask your sweep this question when booking. In general they will need a clear passage to the chimney and adequate space to work in. Clear ornaments from the hearth and perhaps from the mantelpiece. In particular, clear the grate of any fuel / ash / rubbish as cleaning up before they start is a pet hate of most sweeps.

Do I need to have my gas/oil flues swept?

Yes. Although burning these fuels does not normally deposit soot there are numerous other problems which can affect chimney function and sweeping can solve or identify these. In countries such as Germany, where sweeping all chimneys and flues is a legal requirement, the number of carbon monoxide poisonings and chimney fires are a fraction of the UK.

How much does it cost to have my chimney swept?

How long is a piece of string? Seriously though, there are different types of appliance or chimney and the cost will vary. Some jobs may take longer to complete properly so expect to pay more if extra time is necessary. If you are comparing prices of different sweeps try to make sure you are comparing like for like. Cost may also vary in different parts of the country. Guild sweeps can often supply expert advice on fuels and how to get the best out of your stove or fire. This advice alone could save you more than the cost of a sweep over the course of a burning season.

I’ve just moved house – do I need to have my chimney cleaned?

Yes! A chimney fire isn’t the kind of housewarming you want.

Check out our Chimney Sweeps page to see our list of highly recommended companies!

What’s the best wood to burn in my fire?

There are tons of wood types to choose from! Today we’re going to tell you which wood is right YOUR fire!

Different wood types have their own burning woodqualities and properties and although there are references to burning green wood in this guide, we would say that for the most efficient and effective burn in your wood burning stove only very dry wood should be used.

There are of course the compressed reclaimed ‘eco’ type of logs and briquettes.  These tend to burn well and for a decent length of time because they are dense and very dry, but try to choose a product that doesn’t break apart too easily.

There are over 30 types of wood you can choose from!

Alder Produces poor heat output and it does not last well. Poor
Apple A very good wood that bums slow and steady when dry, it has small flame size, and does not produce sparking or spitting. Good
Ash Reckoned by many to be one of best woods for burning, it produces a steady flame and good heat output. It can be burnt when green but like all woods, it burns best when dry. Very good
Beech Burns very much like ash, but does not burn well when green. Very good
Birch Produces good heat output but it does burn quickly. It can be burnt unseasoned, however the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Good
Cedar Is a good burning wood that produces a consistent and long heat output. It burns with a small flame, but does tend to crackle and spit and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Good
Cherry Is a slow to burn wood that produces a good heat output. Cherry needs to be seasoned well. Good
Chestnut A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output. Poor
Firs (Douglas etc) A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Poor
Elm Is a wood that can follow several burn patterns because of high moisture content, it should be dried for two years for best results. Elm is slow to get going and it may be necessary to use a better burning wood to start it off. Splitting of logs should be done early. Medium
Eucalyptus Is a fast burning wood. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire if burned unseasoned. Poor
Hawthorn Is a good traditional firewood that has a slow burn with good heat output. Very good
Hazel Is a good but fast burning wood and produces best results when allowed to season. Good
Holly Is a fast burning wood that produces good flame but poor heat output. Holly will burn green, but best dried for a minimum of a year. Poor
Hornbeam A good burning wood that burns similar to beech, slow burn with a good heat output. Good
Horse Chestnut A good wood for burning in wood stoves but not for open fires as it does tend to spit a lot.  It does however produce a good flame and heat output. Good (For stoves only)
Laburnum A very smokey wood with a poor burn. Poor do not use
Larch Produces a reasonable heat output, but it needs to be well seasoned. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Medium
Laurel Burns with a good flame but only reasonable heat output. It needs to be well seasoned. Medium
Lilac Its smaller branches are good to use as kindling, the wood itself burns well with a good flame. Good
Maple Is a good burning wood that produces good flame and heat output. Good
Oak Because of its density, oak produces a small flame and very slow burn, it is best when seasoned for a minimum of two years as it is a wood that requires time to season well. Good
Pear Burns well with good heat output, however it does need to be seasoned well. Good
Pine (Including Leylandii) Burns with a good flame, but the resin sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire must be well seasoned. Good (with caution)
Plum A good burning wood that produces good heat output. Good
Poplar A very smokey wood with a poor burn. Very poor
Rowan Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output. Very good
Robinia (Acacia) Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output. It does produce an acrid and dense smoke but this is of course not a problem in a stove. Good  (For Stoves only)
Spruce Produces a poor heat output and it does not last well. Poor
Sycamore Produces a good flame, but with only moderate heat output. Should only be used well-seasoned. Medium
Sweet Chestnut The wood burns ok when well-seasoned but it does tend to spit a lot. This is of course not a problem in a stove. Medium (For Stoves only)
Thorn Is one of the best woods for burning. It produces a steady flame and very good heat output, and produces very little smoke. Very good
Willow A poor fire wood that does not burn well even when seasoned. Poor
Yew A good burning wood as it has a slow burn, and produces a very good heat output. Very good

Another great wood is Kiln Dried wood!

Kiln dried logs provide you with the ultimate burn quality with maximum heat output. The kiln drying process in our wood fired kilns remove most of the water for you, down to below an average of 20% moisture content. Burning kiln dried logs will ensure your stove glass is kept clean and will prevent a build-up of soot or tar in your chimney or flue and because you get so much heat output, you will actually need less kiln dried logs, than if you were to buy seasoned logs, thus providing you with great value for money. Kiln dried logs also provide you with a consistent product that you can rely on every time, unlike ‘seasoned logs’ which can be inconsistent in terms of their moisture content due to the natural and varied drying process. The standard length of 25cm kiln dried logs is recommended by stove manufacturers to fit 99% of wood burning or multi-fuel stoves.

You can purchase kiln dried wood for your fire at certainlywood.co.uk!

Our first Blog Post!

rt-Sarahs-Livingroom-008We want our website to be a place where you can find inspiration for your home, learn new things and connect with us through all of our social media!

We are so excited to announce that we’ll be posting regular blog posts on a
topic we think you will find interesting!

We’ll have posts on inspo, design, facts, safety and much more!!

Stay tuned- AM Chimneys.

 

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CO Alarms: Why they are essential in your home!

In this post we are going to talk about why it is SO important to have a CO alarm present in your home…yes it sounds boring BUT just have a read and you may be shocked!

A carbon monoxide alarm or CO detector is a device that detects the presence of carbon monoxide (CO) gas in order to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

Kidde_Compact_Carbon_Monoxide_Alarm_1053437Carbon monoxide can easily go undetected as it’s a colourless, odourless, tasteless and a toxic gas produced as a by-product of combustion. It’s extremely dangerous if you have a leak!

Heres a list of common house-hold items that produce CO. If you have any of these, you could have a leak right now and not even know!

  • Gas Fires
  • Open Fireplaces and woodstoves
  • Fuel fired furnaces (non-electric)
  • Gas dryers
  • Gas stoves
  • Gas water heaters
  • Gas boilers

Heres a crazy fact! 

  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) reports that approximately 200 people per year are killed by accidental CO poisoning with an additional 5000 people injured.

So if you would like to purchase a CO alarm from us for only £15 +VAT* then please contact us to stay safe from CO Poisoning!

*A delivery charge may apply.